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fesworks:

This week’s word is “adoption”, sent to us by Steaky! On today’s show, we tackle Dan’s complicated back-story from the day he was conceived to the day he poisoned his friends with frozen beverages. Also, we worship Mat’s Mom, Fish goes searching for cookies, Mat puts his foot in questionable places, and Andrew nearly jumps out of a moving vehicle.

Ooops, meant to post this with the WCBN first.

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conceptcookie:

Exercise 27 Results: Shading Candy Step by Step by: Tim Von Rueden (vonn)

Check out our sweet Candy Study results with full step by step explanation HERE.

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Zoom melissaknowsthings:

totalspiffage:

zaquanimus:

parkaposy:

NEW AVAILABLE ART PROGRAM
It seems to be a mix between SAI and photoshop, simplified. It even has a stabalizer that works even with the mouse.
Best of all, it’s free, and works for both Mac and Windows.
To give it a try, head right on down to http://firealpaca.com/



Reblogging for artsy people that follow me. Also a lovely name for a program.

I highly recommend FireAlpaca for everyone.

melissaknowsthings:

totalspiffage:

zaquanimus:

parkaposy:

NEW AVAILABLE ART PROGRAM

It seems to be a mix between SAI and photoshop, simplified. It even has a stabalizer that works even with the mouse.

Best of all, it’s free, and works for both Mac and Windows.

To give it a try, head right on down to http://firealpaca.com/

image

Reblogging for artsy people that follow me. Also a lovely name for a program.

highly recommend FireAlpaca for everyone.

08.28.14 162003

fesworks:

Please go to www.ALSA.org to make a donation. With the amount raised this summer, they can get some serious research done in the next few years!

The nominated people are:

Mat, Dan, and Fish of The One Word, Go! Show podcast (onewordgoshow.com)

Kurt Sasso of TGT Media (TGTMedia.com)

Melissa and Windy of Xanadu Cinema Pleasure Dome podcast (XanaduCinema.com)

Tim, Nick, and Molly of Geeks Without God (GeeksWithoutGod.com)

Fes is from The WCBN (WebcastBeacon.com)

08.28.14 1

grypwolf:

… AND THAT IS THE WAY I MAKE FIRE! Simple and messy “how to gry”.
I will add quick smoke tutorial / step by step too Just wait. \o/

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cubewatermelon:

Sometimes I think it’s okay to just admit that you like looking at certain kinds of people naked and that’s okay.

08.22.14 3343
Zoom bluedelliquanti:

faitherinhicks:

scarygoround:

One thing I don’t undertand in comics is characters talking with their mouths closed. You see it all the time in mainstream books. I’m certain there’s a point when I was drawing comics that I flipped from not even thinking about the closed mouth talkers (my early stuff is full of them) to really hating them. It completely punctures the reality of a panel for me if someone’s talking with their mouth closed.

This drives me crazy! A speech bubble floating above a character’s head, and he or she has their mouth shut. Don’t do this! It loses the immediacy of the dialog when the mouth isn’t open.

Like lots of rules in comics, this is a good one to notice and understand why it exists, so that you know when it’s okay to break it. 
Having the character’s mouth open during dialogue helps with the immediacy, as Faith says. You can even draw the mouth in such a way that you can see what word in the bubble they’re emphasizing, and is therefore the most important. See how in David Willis’s fifth panel here, you can tell Jacob’s saying “Sorry?”

But there is value in having a character’s mouth be closed at certain moments in dialogue sequences. If you see a closed mouth after a word balloon, your brain adds a “beat” for finality. It can add time and alter the rhythm of a conversation. It can also clarify the mood of a character or scene.
I reread the archives of Templar, Arizona recently, and there’s a character, Reagan, who dominates nearly every scene she’s in. She’s physically expressive and has a distinct speaking style. He mouth rarely closes. When it does, it’s during a very serious conversation. She’s dialing down her bombastic personality so other people will pay attention to her, because something is wrong.

When I designed my comic’s leads, I wanted to physically distinguish them in as many ways as I could. In Al’s default state, his mouth is usually closed. Al evolved into a character who does better with silence, because his mustache is a great tool for being expressive without any dialogue. Chuck Jones taught me that.

Brendan’s default, on the other hand, is having his mouth open most of the time. It helps show how he dominates the dialogue and the chemistry between him and Al. When his mouth is shown closed during a dialogue scene, it’s very deliberate. When you notice artists following these helpful rules, understand when it might be more effective to break them.

bluedelliquanti:

faitherinhicks:

scarygoround:

One thing I don’t undertand in comics is characters talking with their mouths closed. You see it all the time in mainstream books. I’m certain there’s a point when I was drawing comics that I flipped from not even thinking about the closed mouth talkers (my early stuff is full of them) to really hating them. It completely punctures the reality of a panel for me if someone’s talking with their mouth closed.

This drives me crazy! A speech bubble floating above a character’s head, and he or she has their mouth shut. Don’t do this! It loses the immediacy of the dialog when the mouth isn’t open.

Like lots of rules in comics, this is a good one to notice and understand why it exists, so that you know when it’s okay to break it. 

Having the character’s mouth open during dialogue helps with the immediacy, as Faith says. You can even draw the mouth in such a way that you can see what word in the bubble they’re emphasizing, and is therefore the most important. See how in David Willis’s fifth panel here, you can tell Jacob’s saying “Sorry?”

amazi-girl's boots should be uggs

But there is value in having a character’s mouth be closed at certain moments in dialogue sequences. If you see a closed mouth after a word balloon, your brain adds a “beat” for finality. It can add time and alter the rhythm of a conversation. It can also clarify the mood of a character or scene.

I reread the archives of Templar, Arizona recently, and there’s a character, Reagan, who dominates nearly every scene she’s in. She’s physically expressive and has a distinct speaking style. He mouth rarely closes. When it does, it’s during a very serious conversation. She’s dialing down her bombastic personality so other people will pay attention to her, because something is wrong.

image

When I designed my comic’s leads, I wanted to physically distinguish them in as many ways as I could. In Al’s default state, his mouth is usually closed. Al evolved into a character who does better with silence, because his mustache is a great tool for being expressive without any dialogue. Chuck Jones taught me that.

image

Brendan’s default, on the other hand, is having his mouth open most of the time. It helps show how he dominates the dialogue and the chemistry between him and Al. When his mouth is shown closed during a dialogue scene, it’s very deliberate. When you notice artists following these helpful rules, understand when it might be more effective to break them.

image

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Make your story fit your format

kelmcdonald:

New Post has been published on http://www.sorcery101.net/news/make-your-story-fit-your-format/

Make your story fit your format

Hey any starting out comic creators,

I wanted to talk about designing your story to the format it will be read it. So I’m mostly posting this because of two things:…

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Me: I can't wait until the kids go back to school.
Friend: But you don't have any kids...
Me: Yes, but back to school sales means cheap stationary.
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Zoom did-you-kno:

An artist created what appears to be a high-definition photograph of a dog getting a bath, but it’s actually made of 221,184 round sprinkles.
Source

THIS IS HOW YOU ART HARDER.

did-you-kno:

An artist created what appears to be a high-definition photograph of a dog getting a bath, but it’s actually made of 221,184 round sprinkles.

Source

THIS IS HOW YOU ART HARDER.

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